Out in open

The more, the merrier. Join and conjoin!

Friday, July 06, 2007

How Celebrex Should Be Taken When Prescribed

How Celebrex Should Be Taken When Prescribed

Celebrex should be taken exactly as it's prescribed by your physician. Users should avoid taking the medication in larger amounts; or taking it for longer than recommended by your doctor.  Follow the directions on your prescription label.  It is recommended that Celebrex not be taken on an empty stomach, in order to avoid nausea. The extended release capsule should not be crushed, chewed, broken or otherwise tampered with.  As such, the pill sh! ould be swallowed whole. That's because the time-release capsule is specially made to release medicine slowly into the body.  Breaking or opening the pill would thereby cause too much of the drug to be released into your system at one time. When taking the oral suspension liquid version of the drug, it should be shaken well (just before you measure a dose). To be sure you get the correct dosage, measure the liquid with a marked measuring spoon, as opposed to a regular table spoon. If you do not have a dosage-measuring device, ask your pharmacist for one. If you take Celebrex for a long period of time, your doctor may want to check you on a regular basis, for any potential harmful effects.

  

Thursday, July 05, 2007

The Future of Celebrex

The Future of Celebrex

            Most people who take Celebrex are probably unaware that COX-2 inhibitors lived a double life, as both painkillers and potential cancer therapies. After Vioxx was pulled from the market in September of 2004, the future of Celebrex (at least as a cancer prevention therapy), now appears to be in question. This was after Pfizer announced in 2005 that it was cancelling all cancer trials related to Celebrex. No one is for sure whether or not Celebrex will fade from the spotlight or continue t! o become successful, as a cancer-fighting drug.  That's because cancer prevention and treatment trials using Celebrex were underway or about to begin, at the time Pfizer issued its announcement. Nationwide, cancer researchers are now studying the results of the two colon cancer trials that were already underway, involving the use of Celebrex, at the time of Pfizer's announcement. At this time, researchers are waiting for additional analyses to take place, before they make any decisions about which COX-2 inhibitor cancer studies should continue.